New Mexico:   There's No Place Like Home    p 2 of 2

 

4 Oct 2014

Near our Lewis's Woodpecker spot, we come across a Red-naped Sapsucker doing what sapsuckers do.

Red-naped Sapsuckers were coming to my water fixture all through September.  I made grandious promises to Chad that he was bound to get killer shots.  But we had two days of rain just before he arrived.  Nary a sapsucker was seen from our back deck while Chad was here.

 

 

RN-Sapsucker.jpg (523237 bytes)

 

Cassin's Finch male

 

 

 

 

 

 

We see Cassin's Finches, like the male here, sometimes in spring and again in fall.  But not in summer.  It seems our elevation of 7900' is still too low for these high-altitude birds.

This afternoon we drive out to Heron Lake, whose dry juniper/pinyon pine habitat harbors a different suite of birds from those found around the the tall ponderosa pines & white firs shading the cabin.

Chad's mp3 player brings in a Juniper Titmouse or two, this one perched on sagebrush..  Birders have been known to swoon at the sheer magnificence of this stunning titmouse.  Well, no, not really.  

Juniper Titmouse
Red-shafted Flicker

 

 

 

 

 

 

Further down the road, Chad plays calls of the Common (Red-shafted) Flicker.  The real bird comes in to see what's going on just as the sun is setting.  

Townsend's Solitaire

 

Another forest bird around the cabin, Townsend's Solitaire, only began to come to my water fixture last month.  Since then two adults have come every day, along with  one juvenile.
White-breasted Nuthatch comes to the seed feeders every day we're here from May to October.  It often tries to intimidate other, larger birds on the tray by spreading its wings and tail. 


  

White-breasted Nuthatch

 

Williamson's Sapsucker  

Another bird I hoped to show Chad was the handsome male Williamson's Sapsucker.  Although shy around other birds, it came to my water fixture in early September.  But then it was seen no more.

About that time a female Williamson's started coming for a good drink.  She was the last bird photographed.


   
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